Food photography techniques to capture the minimalist kitchen

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The rise of the minimalist kitchen is changing the art of food photography. Below are some of the techniques photographers have used to capture this modern kitchen’s simplicity and spirit. Whether it’s coming out of recession or a genuine desire to downsize and simplify, a minimalist kitchen has become extremely popular. Everything from expensive and complicated to buy ingredients to rarely used specialty utensils and equipment has been kept to a minimum. Less is more. Many photographers have consciously or intuitively noticed this change and are evolving and adapting their techniques accordingly. The luscious old glittery, overloaded image doesn’t seem like a good match for this new approach to cooking and eating in general.

Food photography techniques to capture the minimalist kitchen

Photographers who understand this and have an idea of ​​the subject have started using specific techniques that emphasize the subject but in a much more discreet way. This article will introduce some of these basic techniques. It is not intended to be a comprehensive photography manual, and most plans do not require expensive equipment. However, it should be noted that even a simple DSLR can provide much more flexibility than even the best point and shoot due to the amount of control available to the operator. However, this does not mean that perfectly acceptable results cannot be achieved with the tip and the tips, only the range of possibilities is more minor.

Simplicity is success

When composing the shot, make things very simple; smooth white plates and smooth or brushed steel countertops work great. If the image needs a little extra color, a sprig of a fresh herb such as sage is more than enough. Shoot a level or a few degrees above the food. We are used to belittling food, and in photography, it is always a good idea to offer a new perspective as it shakes up the viewer’s brain. It also adds exciting lighting possibilities, but more on that’s later.

A blurred background is a good thing as it emphasizes the subject. This can be achieved by using a long lens, eg. A 300ml wide aperture from a few feet away with a DSLR or with the macro setting in one target and shoot and get very close, usually within 30cm of the subject. Both approaches have the added benefit of offering a very shallow depth of field. This means that probably only a tiny part of the main subject is in focus. This further focuses the viewer’s attention.

The tripod

The only equipment essential for high-quality food photography, besides a camera, of course, is a tripod. It may not be necessary for every shot, but you’ll rule out many potentially good photos if you don’t have one. The options would be between a small desktop model, probably better with the minor point and shoot camera. This would allow the tripod to be placed on the same surface as the object being photographed, very useful when the camera needs to be close to food. A small tripod is available with flexible legs that allow it to be wrapped around objects such as tree branches and signposts. This type of support is helpful for picnics or barbecues, for example. Larger DSLR cameras are generally too heavy for smaller tripods and typically require a full-size model. The advice photographers often get is to buy the most expensive tripod they can afford. I’d say get the tripod that will get the job done without breaking the bank.

Whatever tripod is used, always release the camera shutter remotely or use the self-timer function built into almost all cameras on the market. Pressing the shutter button will cause the camera to vibrate, so if you take it off-camera or give the camera time to stabilize before releasing the shutter, you’ll get a much sharper shot. This brings us to the main reason for using a tripod: the photo can be taken in natural light; that is, the flash is not essential. In general, good natural light is always preferable to artificial light when deciding between one or the other, but often the best photos use a combination of both.

To turn on

While the above applies to food photography in general, specific lighting approaches give a more minimalist feel. Using a powerful backlight is one such approach. The best font is a window that fills the entire background. This gives a very bright experience with the colors reduced to pastels and boom

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